Books

The complete range of books published by the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies, including Aboriginal Studies Press and our research areas.

Title Author / Editor Date
Gugu Badhun: People of the Valley of Lagoons Yvonne Cadet-James, Robert Andrew James, Sue McGinty, Russell McGregor Jun, 2017 Gugu Badhun: People of the Valley of Lagoons

Bridging historical scholarship and Aboriginal oral tradition, this innovative book tells the story of the Gugu Badhun people of the Valley of Lagoons in North Queensland.

Alice's daughter: lost mission child Rhonda Collard-Spratt, Jacki Ferro Apr, 2017 Alice's daughter: lost mission child cover

In 1954, aged three, Rhonda Collard-Spratt was taken from her Aboriginal family and placed on Carnarvon Native Mission, Western Australia.

Alice's daughter: lost mission child Rhonda Collard-Spratt, Jacki Ferro Apr, 2017 Alice's daughter: lost mission child cover

In 1954, aged three, Rhonda Collard-Spratt was taken from her Aboriginal family and placed on Carnarvon Native Mission, Western Australia.

Alice's daughter: lost mission child Rhonda Collard-Spratt, Jacki Ferro Apr, 2017 Alice's daughter: lost mission child

In 1954, aged three, Rhonda Collard-Spratt was taken from her Aboriginal family and placed on Carnarvon Native Mission, Western Australia.

Alice's daughter: lost mission child Rhonda Collard-Spratt, Jacki Ferro Apr, 2017 Alice's daughter: lost mission child cover

In 1954, aged three, Rhonda Collard-Spratt was taken from her Aboriginal family and placed on Carnarvon Native Mission, Western Australia.

Something about emus: Bininj stories from Western Arnhem Land Apr, 2017 Something about emus cover

The emu is an iconic Australian bird of significance to all Australians, but especially so to Indigenous Australians who have had a special relationship with this curious animal for thousands of years.

Something about emus: Bininj stories from Western Arnhem Land Apr, 2017 Something about emus cover

The emu is an iconic Australian bird of significance to all Australians, but especially so to Indigenous Australians who have had a special relationship with this curious animal for thousands of years.

Overturning aqua nullius: securing Aboriginal water rights Virginia Marshall Feb, 2017 Overturning aqua nullius cover

Aboriginal peoples in Australia have the oldest living cultures in the world. From 1788 the British colonisation of Australia marginalised Aboriginal communities from land and water resources and their traditional rights and interests.

Yijarni: true stories from Gurindji country Aug, 2016 Yijarni: true stories from Gurindji country cover

On 23 August 1966, approximately 200 Gurindji stockmen and their families walked off Wave Hill Station in the Northern Territory, protesting against poor working conditions and the taking of their land by pastoralists.

The right to protect sites: Indigenous heritage management in the era of native title Dr Pamela McGrath Jun, 2016 right to protect sites cover

A large and profitable Indigenous heritage management industry has emerged in the wake of the resources boom of recent decades, with thousands of Indigenous heritage impact assessments conducted every year. Yet few governments have successfully reformed heritage laws to accommodate native title rights, and conflict over site destruction is regularly front page news.

The right to protect sites brings together a range of authors who explore native title and Indigenous heritage regimes around the country, and charts the history of advocacy and policy development, highlighting the successes, limitations, inequalities and opportunities of current arrangements.

The right to protect sites: Indigenous heritage management in the era of native title Dr Pamela McGrath Jun, 2016 right to protect sites cover

A large and profitable Indigenous heritage management industry has emerged in the wake of the resources boom of recent decades, with thousands of Indigenous heritage impact assessments conducted every year. Yet few governments have successfully reformed heritage laws to accommodate native title rights, and conflict over site destruction is regularly front page news.

The right to protect sites brings together a range of authors who explore native title and Indigenous heritage regimes around the country, and charts the history of advocacy and policy development, highlighting the successes, limitations, inequalities and opportunities of current arrangements.

Pictures From My Memory: My story as a Ngaatjatjarra woman Lizzie Marrkilyi Ellis May, 2016 Pictures From My Memory: My story as a Ngaatjatjarra woman

Pictures From My Memory is a compelling and accessible autobiographical account of Lizzie Marrkilyi Ellis’ life as a Ngaatjatjarra woman from the Australian Western Desert.

The politics of identity: who counts as Aboriginal today? Bronwyn Carlson Feb, 2016 politics of identity cover

WINNER 2013 STANNER AWARD

The politics of identity: who counts as Aboriginal today? Bronwyn Carlson Feb, 2016 politics of identity cover

WINNER 2013 STANNER AWARD

The politics of identity: who counts as Aboriginal today? Bronwyn Carlson Feb, 2016 politics of identity cover

WINNER 2013 STANNER AWARD

The politics of identity: who counts as Aboriginal today? Bronwyn Carlson Feb, 2016 politics of identity cover

WINNER 2013 STANNER AWARD

The Wentworth Lectures: Honouring fifty years of Australian Indigenous Studies Nov, 2015 The Wentworth Lectures: Honouring fifty years of Australian Indigenous Studies book cover

The Wentworth Lectures honour the contribution of Sir William (Bill) Wentworth to the creation of AIATSIS in 1964; now a world-renowned research, collecting and publishing organisation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait islander cultures, traditions, languages and stories. 

Country women and the colour bar: grassroots activism and the Country Women’s Association Jennifer Jones Oct, 2015 Book cover of Country women and the colour bar - grassroots activism and the Country Women's Association

Country women and the colour bar is a timely corrective to established ideas about race relations in rural New South Wales. It reveals the untold story of grassroots efforts by Aboriginal and white women working together to make significant gains for Aboriginal communities prior to Aboriginal people’s widespread access to citizen’s rights.

Country women and the colour bar: grassroots activism and the Country Women’s Association Jennifer Jones Oct, 2015 Book cover of Country women and the colour bar - grassroots activism and the Country Women's Association

Country women and the colour bar is a timely corrective to established ideas about race relations in rural New South Wales. It reveals the untold story of grassroots efforts by Aboriginal and white women working together to make significant gains for Aboriginal communities prior to Aboriginal people’s widespread access to citizen’s rights.

Old Man’s story: The last thoughts of Kakadu Elder Bill Neidjie Bill Neidjie, Mark Lang Jul, 2015 Old Man’s story: The last thoughts of Kakadu Elder Bill Neidjie

Recognising that he was the last remaining speaker of Gagudju language, Neidjie broke with tradition and committed his knowledge to print. In Old Man’s story he has recorded aspects of his life for a younger generation, to help them look after their country and remember its stories — and for balanda, non-Aboriginal people.

Bill Neidjie, as told to Mark Lang.

Old Man’s story: The last thoughts of Kakadu Elder Bill Neidjie Bill Neidjie, Mark Lang Jul, 2015 Old Man’s story: The last thought of Kakadu Elder Bill Neidjie

Recognising that he was the last remaining speaker of Gagudju language, Neidjie broke with tradition and committed his knowledge to print. In Old Man’s story he has recorded aspects of his life for a younger generation, to help them look after their country and remember its stories — and for balanda, non-Aboriginal people.

Bill Neidjie, as told to Mark Lang.

‘What do we want?’: A political history of Aboriginal land rights in New South Wales Heidi Norman May, 2015 What do we want?’: A political history of Aboriginal land rights in New South Wales

‘What do we want?’ is the first study of the most far-reaching and innovative Aboriginal land rights laws in the country.

Fighting Hard: The Victorian Aborigines Advancement League Richard Broome Feb, 2015 The front cover of the book Fighting Hard: The Victorian Aborigines Advancement League.

Fighting hard tells a history of the Aborigines Advancement League, the oldest Aboriginal organisation in Australia. As both a welfare and activist body, the League is the ‘mother’ of all Aboriginal Victorian community organisations, having spawned a diverse range of organisations.

Fighting Hard: The Victorian Aborigines Advancement League Richard Broome Feb, 2015 Fighting Hard cover

Fighting hard tells a history of the Aborigines Advancement League, the oldest Aboriginal organisation in Australia. As both a welfare and activist body, the League is the ‘mother’ of all Aboriginal Victorian community organisations, having spawned a diverse range of organisations.

Encounters with Indigeneity Jeremy Beckett Nov, 2014 encounters with indigeneity cover

For four decades Jeremy Beckett has shone a light on previously marginalised fields of life. While the many went in search of ‘traditional culture’, Beckett was fascinated to learn how people who often lacked wider recognition of their Aboriginality went about their lives. In the process he changed our understandings of those people and highlighted the issues they confronted.

Encounters with Indigeneity Jeremy Beckett Nov, 2014 encounters with indigeneity cover

For four decades Jeremy Beckett has shone a light on previously marginalised fields of life. While the many went in search of ‘traditional culture’, Beckett was fascinated to learn how people who often lacked wider recognition of their Aboriginality went about their lives. In the process he changed our understandings of those people and highlighted the issues they confronted.

Encounters with Indigeneity Jeremy Beckett Nov, 2014 encounters with indigeneity cover

For four decades Jeremy Beckett has shone a light on previously marginalised fields of life. While the many went in search of ‘traditional culture’, Beckett was fascinated to learn how people who often lacked wider recognition of their Aboriginality went about their lives. In the process he changed our understandings of those people and highlighted the issues they confronted.

Encounters with Indigeneity Jeremy Beckett Nov, 2014 encounters with indigeneity cover

For four decades Jeremy Beckett has shone a light on previously marginalised fields of life. While the many went in search of ‘traditional culture’, Beckett was fascinated to learn how people who often lacked wider recognition of their Aboriginality went about their lives. In the process he changed our understandings of those people, highlighted the issues they confronted and enriched our appreciation of the diversity of Indigenous identities and experiences.

Melbourne Dreaming: A guide to important places of the past and present (Second edition) Meyer Eidelson Sep, 2014 melbourne dreaming cover

Beneath Melbourne's busy city landscape lie layers of a turbulent history and an ongoing vibrant Aboriginal culture. Melbourne Dreaming allows you to learn the past and appreciate Aboriginal people's historical, cultural, social and economic contribution to the city.

Melbourne Dreaming: A guide to important places of the past and present (Second edition) Meyer Eidelson Sep, 2014 melbourne dreaming cover

Beneath Melbourne's busy city landscape lie layers of a turbulent history and an ongoing vibrant Aboriginal culture. Melbourne Dreaming allows you to learn the past and appreciate Aboriginal people's historical, cultural, social and economic contribution to the city.

Remembering the future: Walpiri life through the prism of drawing Melinda Hinkson Aug, 2014 Remembering the future cover

What can drawings reveal about their makers? In 1953 anthropologist Mervyn Meggitt invited Warlpiri men at Hooker Creek to draw with crayons and paper. Two men astounded him with their drawings made 'for the pleasure of drawing'. Six decades later the Warlpiri men's descendants have been introduced to the drawings, triggering memories of dislocation and galvanizing attention to the present day as well as fears and hopes for the future. Remembering the future breaks new ground in writing about Central Australian Aboriginal art and makes a significant contribution to Australian anthropology and the interdisciplinary field of visual studies.

Remembering the future: Walpiri life through the prism of drawing Melinda Hinkson Aug, 2014 Remembering the future cover

What can drawings reveal about their makers? In 1953 anthropologist Mervyn Meggitt invited Warlpiri men at Hooker Creek to draw with crayons and paper. Two men astounded him with their drawings made 'for the pleasure of drawing'. Six decades later the Warlpiri men's descendants have been introduced to the drawings, triggering memories of dislocation and galvanizing attention to the present day as well as fears and hopes for the future.

Kangkushot: The life of Nyamal Lawman Peter Coppin (Second edition) Jolly Read, Peter Coppin Jun, 2014 kangkushot cover

Kangkushot provides valuable insights into the rich and spiritual way Aboriginal people view their lives and land, and their place in it. This is an updated edition of an epic and remarkable story of senior Nyamal lawman, Peter Coppin, who dreamed of a different life for his people. Despite great danger to themselves, he and others took part in the longest Aboriginal strike in Australia, the Pilbara Strike in 1946.

Kangkushot: The life of Nyamal Lawman Peter Coppin (Second edition) Jolly Read, Peter Coppin Jun, 2014 kangkushot cover

Kangkushot provides valuable insights into the rich and spiritual way Aboriginal people view their lives and land, and their place in it. This is an updated edition of an epic and remarkable story of senior Nyamal lawman, Peter Coppin, who dreamed of a different life for his people. Despite great danger to themselves, he and others took part in the first Aboriginal strike in Australia, the Pilbara Strike in 1946.

Kangkushot: The life of Nyamal Lawman Peter Coppin (Second edition) Jolly Read, Peter Coppin Jun, 2014 kangkushot cover

Kangkushot provides valuable insights into the rich and spiritual way Aboriginal people view their lives and land, and their place in it. This is an updated edition of an epic and remarkable story of senior Nyamal lawman, Peter Coppin, who dreamed of a different life for his people. Despite great danger to themselves, he and others took part in the first Aboriginal strike in Australia, the Pilbara Strike in 1946.

Kangkushot: The life of Nyamal Lawman Peter Coppin (Second edition) Jolly Read, Peter Coppin Jun, 2014 kangkushot cover

Kangkushot provides valuable insights into the rich and spiritual way Aboriginal people view their lives and land, and their place in it. This is an updated edition of an epic and remarkable story of senior Nyamal lawman, Peter Coppin, who dreamed of a different life for his people. Despite great danger to themselves, he and others took part in the first Aboriginal strike in Australia, the Pilbara Strike in 1946.

Calling the shots: Aboriginal photographies Jane Lydon Apr, 2014 Calling the shots cover

Historically, photographs of Indigenous Australians were often produced under unequal and exploitative circumstances. Today, however, such images represent a rich cultural heritage for descendants who can use this rich archive to explore Aboriginal history, to identify relatives, and to reclaim culture. In Aboriginal photographies contributors investigate the Indigenous significance of engaging with images from each of the former colonies.

Calling the shots: Aboriginal photographies Jane Lydon Apr, 2014 Calling the shots cover

Historically, photographs of Indigenous Australians were often produced under unequal and exploitative circumstances. Today, however, such images represent a rich cultural heritage for descendants who can use this rich archive to explore Aboriginal history, to identify relatives, and to reclaim culture. In Aboriginal photographies contributors investigate the Indigenous significance of engaging with images from each of the former colonies.

Calling the shots: Aboriginal photographies Jane Lydon Apr, 2014 Calling the shots cover

Historically, photographs of Indigenous Australians were often produced under unequal and exploitative circumstances. Today, however, such images represent a rich cultural heritage for descendants who can use this rich archive to explore Aboriginal history, to identify relatives, and to reclaim culture. In Aboriginal photographies contributors investigate the Indigenous significance of engaging with images from each of the former colonies.

Calling the shots: Aboriginal photographies Jane Lydon Apr, 2014 Calling the shots cover

Historically, photographs of Indigenous Australians were often produced under unequal and exploitative circumstances. Today, however, such images represent a rich cultural heritage for descendants who can use this rich archive to explore Aboriginal history, to identify relatives, and to reclaim culture. In Aboriginal photographies contributors investigate the Indigenous significance of engaging with images from each of the former colonies.

Calling the shots: Aboriginal photographies Jane Lydon Apr, 2014 Calling the shots cover

Historically, photographs of Indigenous Australians were often produced under unequal and exploitative circumstances. Today, however, such images represent a rich cultural heritage for descendants who can use this rich archive to explore Aboriginal history, to identify relatives, and to reclaim culture. In Aboriginal photographies contributors investigate the Indigenous significance of engaging with images from each of the former colonies.

Calling the shots: Aboriginal photographies Jane Lydon Apr, 2014 Calling the shots cover

Historically, photographs of Indigenous Australians were often produced under unequal and exploitative circumstances. Today, however, such images represent a rich cultural heritage for descendants who can use this rich archive to explore Aboriginal history, to identify relatives, and to reclaim culture. In Aboriginal photographies contributors investigate the Indigenous significance of engaging with images from each of the former colonies.

Arresting Incarceration - Pathways out of Indigenous imprisonment Don Weatherburn Feb, 2014 Arresting incarceration cover

Rates of Indigenous imprisonment have soared despite sweeping reforms by the Keating government following the 1991 Royal Commission into Aboriginal Deaths in Custody. What has gone wrong?

Arresting Incarceration - Pathways out of Indigenous imprisonment Don Weatherburn Feb, 2014 Arresting incarceration cover

Rates of Indigenous imprisonment have soared despite sweeping reforms by the Keating government following the 1991 Royal Commission into Aboriginal Deaths in Custody. What has gone wrong?

Arresting Incarceration - Pathways out of Indigenous imprisonment Don Weatherburn Feb, 2014 Arresting incarceration cover

Rates of Indigenous imprisonment have soared despite sweeping reforms by the Keating government following the 1991 Royal Commission into Aboriginal Deaths in Custody. What has gone wrong?

Arresting Incarceration - Pathways out of Indigenous imprisonment Don Weatherburn Feb, 2014 Arresting incarceration cover

Rates of Indigenous imprisonment have soared despite sweeping reforms by the Keating government following the 1991 Royal Commission into Aboriginal Deaths in Custody. What has gone wrong?

Aborigines and the 'Sport of Kings': Aboriginal jockeys in Australian racing history (Third edition) John Maynard Nov, 2013 Aborigines and the Sport of Kings cover

Coming from an Aboriginal family involved in racing, John Maynard has always know there have been more Aboriginal jockeys contributing to Australian racing than is generally known. In Aborigines and the ‘Sport of Kings’ he combines his skills as a researcher and historian with his deep knowledge of Australian racing.

Aborigines and the 'Sport of Kings': Aboriginal jockeys in Australian racing history (Third edition) John Maynard Nov, 2013 Aborigines and the Sport of Kings cover

Coming from an Aboriginal family involved in racing, John Maynard has always know there have been more Aboriginal jockeys contributing to Australian racing than is generally known. In Aborigines and the ‘Sport of Kings’ he combines his skills as a researcher and historian with his deep knowledge of Australian racing.

Aborigines and the 'Sport of Kings': Aboriginal jockeys in Australian racing history (Third edition) John Maynard Nov, 2013 Aborigines and the Sport of Kings cover

Coming from an Aboriginal family involved in racing, John Maynard has always know there have been more Aboriginal jockeys contributing to Australian racing than is generally known. In Aborigines and the ‘Sport of Kings’ he combines his skills as a researcher and historian with his deep knowledge of Australian racing.

Aborigines and the 'Sport of Kings': Aboriginal jockeys in Australian racing history (Third edition) John Maynard Nov, 2013 Aborigines and the Sport of Kings cover

Coming from an Aboriginal family involved in racing, John Maynard has always know there have been more Aboriginal jockeys contributing to Australian racing than is generally known. In Aborigines and the ‘Sport of Kings’ he combines his skills as a researcher and historian with his deep knowledge of Australian racing.

Coranderrk: We will show the country Giordano Nanni, Andrea James Oct, 2013 coranderrk cover

The Aboriginal people of Coranderrk reserve in central Victoria waged a sustained campaign for justice, land rights and self-determination in colonial Australia. Despite having created an award-winning farm they were targeted for removal. Their lobbying of government, with their white supporters, triggered a Parliamentary Inquiry in 1881.

Coranderrk: We will show the country Giordano Nanni, Andrea James Oct, 2013 coranderrk cover

The Aboriginal people of Coranderrk reserve in central Victoria waged a sustained campaign for justice, land rights and self-determination in colonial Australia. Despite having created an award-winning farm they were targeted for removal. Their lobbying of government, with their white supporters, triggered a Parliamentary Inquiry in 1881.

Protest, Land Rights and Riots: Postcolonial struggles in Australia in the 1980s Barry Morris Aug, 2013 rights and riots cover

The 1970s saw the battle for Aboriginal people’s struggles for recognition of their postcolonial rights. Rural communities, where large Aboriginal populations lived, were in foment as a consequence of political, economic and major structural change, social fragmentation and unparalleled unemployment. The ensuing so-called riots, protests and law-and-order campaigns captured much of the tense relations that existed between Indigenous people, the police and the criminal justice system. In Protest land rights and riots, Barry Morris shows how those policies targeted Aboriginal people in particular.

Aboriginal ways of using English Diana Eades Jun, 2013 aboriginal ways of using english cover

This new collection by Professor Diana Eades addresses the way non-traditional language Aboriginal speakers of English use and speak English. To understand Aboriginal ways of speaking English leads to better understanding Aboriginal identity, a better engagement in intercultural communication, and learning about the complexities of how English is used by and with Aboriginal people in the legal process.

Aboriginal ways of using English Diana Eades Jun, 2013

This new collection by Professor Diana Eades addresses the way non-traditional language Aboriginal speakers of English use and speak English. To understand Aboriginal ways of speaking English leads to better understanding Aboriginal identity, a better engagement in intercultural communication, and learning about the complexities of how English is used by and with Aboriginal people in the legal process.

Aboriginal ways of using English Diana Eades Jun, 2013 aboriginal ways of using english cover

This new collection by Professor Diana Eades addresses the way non-traditional language Aboriginal speakers of English use and speak English. To understand Aboriginal ways of speaking English leads to better understanding Aboriginal identity, a better engagement in intercultural communication, and learning about the complexities of how English is used by and with Aboriginal people in the legal process.

Aboriginal ways of using English Diana Eades Jun, 2013 aboriginal ways of using english cover

This new collection by Professor Diana Eades addresses the way non-traditional language Aboriginal speakers of English use and speak English. To understand Aboriginal ways of speaking English leads to better understanding Aboriginal identity, a better engagement in intercultural communication, and learning about the complexities of how English is used by and with Aboriginal people in the legal process.

Steady Steady: The life and music of Seaman Dan Henry Gibson Dan, Karl Neuenfeldt May, 2013 Steady Steady: The life and music of Seaman Dan cover

Born on Thursday Island in 1929, Seaman Dan didn’t release his debut album, ‘Follow the Sun’, until his 70th birthday. In the next ten years he released five albums, showcasing traditional music from the Torres Strait, as well as those revealing his love of jazz and blues. Steady steady: The life and music of Seaman Dan is replete with Uncle Seaman’s stories of his active and sometimes dangerous life in the islands in the heyday of pearl diving and other jobs, and his later development as a professional singer/musician.

Steady Steady: The life and music of Seaman Dan Henry Gibson Dan, Karl Neuenfeldt May, 2013 Cover Steady Steady: The life and music of Seaman Dan

Born on Thursday Island in 1929, Seaman Dan didn’t release his debut album, ‘Follow the Sun’, until his 70th birthday. In the next ten years he released five albums, showcasing traditional music from the Torres Strait, as well as those revealing his love of jazz and blues. Steady Steady: The life and music of Seaman Dan is replete with Uncle Seaman’s stories of his active and sometimes dangerous life in the islands in the heyday of pearl diving and other jobs, and his later development as a professional singer/musician.

Our Stories are our Survival Dr Lawrence Bamblett Mar, 2013 stories are our survival cover

Our stories are our survival centres on the continuity of Wiradjuri culture. It is a celebration of storytelling and the joys of life within an Aboriginal Australian community. It offers an alternative to the commonly told stories of Aboriginal disadvantage. Using sport as a lens, the book brings to light the continued strength of Aboriginal culture.

Our Stories are our Survival Dr Lawrence Bamblett Mar, 2013 stories are our survival cover

Our stories are our survival centres on the continuity of Wiradjuri culture. It is a celebration of storytelling and the joys of life within an Aboriginal Australian community. Our stories offers an alternative to the commonly told stories of Aboriginal disadvantage. Using sport as a lens, the book brings to light the continued strength of Aboriginal culture.

The Little Red Yellow Black Book: An introduction to Indigenous Australia (Third Edition) Bruce Pascoe Oct, 2012 Little Red Yellow Black Book cover

The new edition of The little red yellow black book updates this successful and widely used introduction to contemporary Indigenous Australia, now with new stories and images. Written from an Indigenous viewpoint, The little red yellow black book is a competitively priced and enjoyable resource on subjects as diverse as languages, education, governance, sport, arts, resistance and activism.

The Little Red Yellow Black Book: An introduction to Indigenous Australia (Third Edition) Bruce Pascoe Oct, 2012 Little Red Yellow Black Book cover

The new edition of The little red yellow black book updates this successful and widely used introduction to contemporary Indigenous Australia, now with new stories and images. Written from an Indigenous viewpoint, The little red yellow black book is a competitively priced and enjoyable resource on subjects as diverse as languages, education, governance, sport, arts, resistance and activism.

Rethinking Social Justice: From 'peoples' to 'populations' Timothy Rowse Aug, 2012 rethinking social justice cover

In the early 1970s, Australian governments began to treat Aborigines and Torres Strait Islanders as 'peoples' with capacities for self-government. Forty years later, confidence in Indigenous self-determination has been eroded by accounts of Indigenous pathology, of misplaced policy optimism and persistent socio-economic 'gaps'. In this collection of new and revised essays, Tim Rowse accounts for this shift by arguing that Australian thinking about 'Indigenous' is a continuing, unresolvable tussle between the idea of 'peoples' and 'population'.

Our Greatest Challenge: Aboriginal children and human rights Hannah McGlade Jun, 2012 our greatest challenge cover

Hannah McGlade’s new book bravely addresses the complex and fraught issue of Aboriginal child abuse. She argues that Aboriginal child sexual assault has been formed within the entrenched societal forces of racism, colonisation and patriarchy, yet cast in the Australian public domain as an Aboriginal ‘problem’, with controversial government responses critiqued as racist and paternalistic.

Our Greatest Challenge: Aboriginal children and human rights Hannah McGlade Jun, 2012 our greatest challenge cover

Hannah McGlade’s new book bravely addresses the complex and fraught issue of Aboriginal child abuse. She argues that Aboriginal child sexual assault has been formed within the entrenched societal forces of racism, colonisation and patriarchy, yet cast in the Australian public domain as an Aboriginal ‘problem’, with controversial government responses critiqued as racist and paternalistic.

The limits of change: Mabo and native title 20 years on Toni Bauman, Lydia Glick Jun, 2012 The Limits of Change cover

On 3 June 1992, the High Court of Australia handed down the Mabo decision, recognising the continuing rights of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples as the original inhabitants of the land under their own law and customs.

Our Greatest Challenge: Aboriginal children and human rights Hannah McGlade Jun, 2012 our greatest challenge cover

Hannah McGlade’s new book bravely addresses the complex and fraught issue of Aboriginal child abuse. She argues that Aboriginal child sexual assault has been formed within the entrenched societal forces of racism, colonisation and patriarchy, yet is cast in the Australian public domain as an Aboriginal ‘problem’, with controversial government responses critiqued as racist and paternalistic.

Our Greatest Challenge: Aboriginal children and human rights Hannah McGlade Jun, 2012

Hannah McGlade’s new book bravely addresses the complex and fraught issue of Aboriginal child abuse. She argues that Aboriginal child sexual assault has been formed within the entrenched societal forces of racism, colonisation and patriarchy, yet cast in the Australian public domain as an Aboriginal ‘problem’, with controversial government responses critiqued as racist and paternalistic.

The Lone Protestor: AM Fernando in Australia and Europe Fiona Paisley May, 2012 lone protestor cover

The late 1920s saw an extraordinary protest by an Australian Aboriginal man on the streets of London. Standing outside Australia House, cloaked in tiny skeletons, Anthony Martin Fernando condemned the failure of British rule in his country.

The Lone Protestor: AM Fernando in Australia and Europe Fiona Paisley May, 2012 lone protestor cover

The late 1920s saw an extraordinary protest by an Australian Aboriginal man on the streets of London. Standing outside Australia House, cloaked in tiny skeletons, Anthony Martin Fernando condemned the failure of British rule in his country.

The Lone Protestor: AM Fernando in Australia and Europe Fiona Paisley May, 2012 lone protestor cover

The late 1920s saw an extraordinary protest by an Australian Aboriginal man on the streets of London. Standing outside Australia House, cloaked in tiny skeletons, Anthony Martin Fernando condemned the failure of British rule in his country.

The Lone Protestor: AM Fernando in Australia and Europe Fiona Paisley May, 2012 lone protestor cover

The late 1920s saw an extraordinary protest by an Australian Aboriginal man on the streets of London. Standing outside Australia House, cloaked in tiny skeletons, Anthony Martin Fernando condemned the failure of British rule in his country. Paisley brings to light new episodes in Fernando's activist career as well as previously unknown details about his extraordinary life in Australia and overseas. Her account dramatically shifts our understanding of the international reach of Aboriginal protest in this era.

Kurlumarniny: We come from the desert Monty Hale Mar, 2012 kurlumarniny cover

We come from the desert is the story of Minyjun (Monty Hale), a senior Ngulipartu man from the Pilbara region of Western Australia. Written in his own language and in English, Minyjun shares with us his extraordinary life, from his family’s migration from the desert to the station country of the eastern Pilbara, his childhood growing up on Mt Edgar Station, witnessing Australia’s engagement in World War II, and the famous Pilbara station-worker’s strike of 1946.

Kurlumarniny: We come from the desert Monty Hale Mar, 2012

We come from the desert is the story of Minyjun (Monty Hale), a senior Ngulipartu man from the Pilbara region of Western Australia. Written in his own language and in English, Minyjun shares with us his extraordinary life, from his family’s migration from the desert to the station country of the eastern Pilbara, his childhood growing up on Mt Edgar Station, witnessing Australia’s engagement in World War II, and the famous Pilbara station-worker’s strike of 1946.

Belonging Together: Dealing with the politics of disenchantment in Australian Indigenous policy Patrick Sullivan Oct, 2011 belonging together cover

Belonging together provides a unique overview of the trajectory of current Indigenous policy, with Sullivan advancing a new consolidated approach to Indigenous policy which moves beyond the debate over self-determination and assimilation.

Belonging Together: Dealing with the politics of disenchantment in Australian Indigenous policy Patrick Sullivan Oct, 2011 belonging together cover

Belonging together provides a unique overview of the trajectory of current Indigenous policy, with Sullivan advancing a new consolidated approach to Indigenous policy which moves beyond the debate over self-determination and assimilation.

Belonging Together: Dealing with the politics of disenchantment in Australian Indigenous policy Patrick Sullivan Oct, 2011 belonging together cover

Belonging together provides a unique overview of the trajectory of current Indigenous policy, with Sullivan advancing a new consolidated approach to Indigenous policy which moves beyond the debate over self-determination and assimilation.

Indifferent Inclusion: Aboriginal people and the Australian nation Russell McGregor Sep, 2011 indifferent inclusion cover

McGregor offers a holistic interpretation of the complex relationship between Indigenous and settler Australians during the middle four decades of the twentieth century. Combining the perspectives of political, social and cultural history in a coherent narrative, he provides a cogent analysis of how the relationship changed, and the impediments to change.

Indifferent Inclusion: Aboriginal people and the Australian nation Russell McGregor Sep, 2011 indifferent inclusion cover

McGregor offers a holistic interpretation of the complex relationship between Indigenous and settler Australians during the middle four decades of the twentieth century. Combining the perspectives of political, social and cultural history in a coherent narrative, he provides a cogent analysis of how the relationship changed, and the impediments to change.

Indifferent Inclusion: Aboriginal people and the Australian nation Russell McGregor Sep, 2011 indifferent inclusion cover

McGregor offers a holistic interpretation of the complex relationship between Indigenous and settler Australians during the middle four decades of the twentieth century. Combining the perspectives of political, social and cultural history in a coherent narrative, he provides a cogent analysis of how the relationship changed, and the impediments to change.

Legends: The AFL Indigenous team of the century Sean Gorman Aug, 2011 legends cover

Indigenous Australians have given us some of our greatest football champions. With names like Farmer, Winmar, Long, Rioli and Goodes, the stories of Indigenous footballers are some of the most compelling in the great game of AFL. The journey for some has been one of great struggle and difficulty. For them, football was the only way out.

Joan Martin (Yaarna): A Widi Woman Bruce Shaw Jul, 2011 widi woman cover

Joan Martin was born in the country town of Morawa, Western Australia, in 1941. She was a proud Widi woman whose traditional territory extended from Geraldton eastwards into the salt-lake area. Her stories reveal interconnected themes: visiting family, teaching bush lore to her children, passing on Dreaming stories, celebrating culture through her art, along with conflicts with mining companies and white bureaucracies.

Country of the Heart: An Australian Indigenous homeland (Second edition) Deborah Bird Rose, Nancy Daiyi, Kathy Deveraux, Margaret Daiyi, Payi-Linda Ford, April Bright, Sharon D'Amico Jun, 2011 country of the heart cover

Country of the heart provides an introduction to the connections between Aboriginal people and the land that has sustained and nurtured them for generations. Through the wonderful photographic images and the stories of the MakMak clan women (white-breasted sea eagle), readers are led into the heart of country: the people, the animals, the plants, the ancestors, the seasons, and the intimate relationships which tie them together.

I'm the one that know this country! (Second edition) Jessie Lennon Feb, 2011 know this country cover

In I’m the One… Jessie Lennon’s stories are juxtaposed with historical photographs and information of the times, places and people in her life. In a life full of journeys and homecomings, a vivid picture emerges of family life and the importance of ‘home’.

One Law for All? Aboriginal people and criminal law in early South Australia Alan Pope Jan, 2011 One Law for All cover

In the planned colony of South Australia, Aboriginal people were to be British subjects, accountable to English law, but fully entitled to its protection. However, the dreams of London’s reformers rapidly soured as British law struggled to protect the settlers’ interests and failed to protect Aboriginal lives and birthrights. This is the first study of the stories behind the court appearances.Using rarely discussed documents, Pope reveals how the complexities played out and where, despite the rhetoric, Aboriginal people were treated poorly.

Aboriginal Sydney: A guide to important places of the past and present (Second edition) Melinda Hinkson, Alana Harris Nov, 2010 Aboriginal Sydney cover

Aboriginal Sydney is both a guide book and an alternative social history, told through precincts of significance to the city’s Indigenous people.

Australia: William Blandowski’s illustrated encyclopaedia of Aboriginal Australia Harry Allen, Mark Dugay-Grist, Luise Hercus, Thomas Darragh Sep, 2010 william blandowski cover

William Blandowski was an explorer, natural scientist and artist who led a Victorian government expedition to the junction of the Murray and Darling Rivers from 1856 to 1857. Australia is the first publication in English of his nineteenth century illustrated encyclopaedia of Aboriginal life, Australien in 142 photographischen Abbildungen nach zehnjärigen Erfahrungen.

Australia: William Blandowski’s illustrated encyclopaedia of Aboriginal Australia Harry Allen, Mark Dugay-Grist, Luise Hercus, Thomas Darragh Sep, 2010 william blandowski cover

William Blandowski was an explorer, natural scientist and artist who led a Victorian government expedition to the junction of the Murray and Darling Rivers from 1856 to 1857. Australia is the first publication in English of his nineteenth century illustrated encyclopaedia of Aboriginal life, Australien in 142 photographischen Abbildungen nach zehnjärigen Erfahrungen.

Australia: William Blandowski’s illustrated encyclopaedia of Aboriginal Australia Harry Allen, Mark Dugay-Grist, Luise Hercus, Thomas Darragh Sep, 2010 william blandowski cover

William Blandowski was an explorer, natural scientist and artist who led a Victorian government expedition to the junction of the Murray and Darling Rivers from 1856 to 1857. Australia is the first publication in English of his nineteenth century illustrated encyclopaedia of Aboriginal life, Australien in 142 photographischen Abbildungen nach zehnjärigen Erfahrungen.

Dialogue about Land Justice: Papers from the national native title conference Dr Lisa Strelein Jun, 2010 dialogue about land justice cover

Dialogue about land justice encapsulates the key issues that have been at the forefront of discussions about native title for a decade. It comprises a selection of papers presented to the national Native Title Conference, among them, Australia’s leading thinkers, senior jurists and Indigenous leaders.

Dialogue about Land Justice: Papers from the national native title conference Dr Lisa Strelein Jun, 2010 dialogue about land justice cover

Dialogue about land justice comprises a selection of papers by Australia’s leading thinkers, senior jurists and Indigenous leaders. It encapsulates the key issues that have been at the forefront of discussions about native title for a decade.

Dialogue about Land Justice: Papers from the national native title conference Dr Lisa Strelein Jun, 2010 dialogue about land justice cover

Dialogue about land justice encapsulates the key issues that have been at the forefront of discussions about native title for a decade. It comprises a selection of papers presented to the national Native Title Conference, among them, Australia’s leading thinkers, senior jurists and Indigenous leaders.

Singing the Coast Margaret Somerville, Tony Perkins May, 2010 singing the coast cover

Singing the coast offers readers a rare opportunity to visit the heart of Gumbaynggirr culture and trace the shaping of place and identity in coastal Australia. The story began under the coral trees at the Old Camp where Tony Perkins first sat with his grandfather and listened to his stories. His grandfather was an initiated man who brought the spirit creatures along to teach the knowledge that was once passed on in initiation.

Singing the Coast Margaret Somerville, Tony Perkins May, 2010 singing the coast cover

Singing the coast offers readers a rare opportunity to visit the heart of Gumbaynggirr culture and trace the shaping of place and identity in coastal Australia. The story began under the coral trees at the Old Camp where Tony Perkins first sat with his grandfather and listened to his stories. His grandfather was an initiated man who brought the spirit creatures along to teach the knowledge that was once passed on in initiation.

Singing the Coast Margaret Somerville, Tony Perkins May, 2010 singing the coast cover

Singing the coast offers readers a rare opportunity to visit the heart of Gumbaynggirr culture and trace the shaping of place and identity in coastal Australia. The story began under the coral trees at the Old Camp where Tony Perkins first sat with his grandfather and listened to his stories. His grandfather was an initiated man who brought the spirit creatures along to teach the knowledge that was once passed on in initiation.

Palm Island: Through a long lens Joanne Watson Mar, 2010 palm island cover

In November 2004, Mulrunji Doomadgee’s tragic death triggered civil unrest within the Indigenous community of Palm Island. This led to the first prosecution of a Queensland police officer in relation to a death in custody. In Palm Island, Joanne Watson gives the first substantial history of 'Australia's Alcatraz', a political prison of exile for Queensland's 'troublesome blacks', set against a background of some of the most explosive episodes in Queensland history.

Cleared Out: First contact in the Western Desert + 'Contact' DVD Peter Johnson, Yuwali Nixon, Susan Davenport Mar, 2010 contact dvd cover

In 1964, a group of 20 Aboriginal women and children in the Western Desert made their first contact with European Australians — patrol officers from the Woomera Rocket Range, clearing an area into which rockets were to be fired. They had been pursued by the patrol officers for several weeks, running from this frightening new force in the desert.

Compromised jurisprudence: Native title cases since Mabo (Second edition) Dr Lisa Strelein Nov, 2009 Compromised Jurisprudence cover

Summary

Compromised jurisprudence: Native title cases since Mabo (Second edition) Dr Lisa Strelein Nov, 2009 Compromised Jurisprudence 2nd edition cover

Compromised Jurisprudence has established itself as a well-priced and accessible introduction to the subject. Native title has dramatically altered the law and public policy in Australia. It has had a fundamental impact on social relations between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians and the courts have played a central role in its development, and continue to do so.

Compromised jurisprudence: Native title cases since Mabo (Second edition) Dr Lisa Strelein Nov, 2009 Compromised Jurisprudence 2nd edition cover

Compromised Jurisprudence established itself as a well-priced and accessible introduction to the subject.Native title has dramatically altered the law and public policy in Australia. It has had a fundamental impact on social relations between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians and the courts have played a central role in its development, and continue to do so. 

Throwing Off the Cloak: Reclaiming self-reliance in Torres Strait Elizabeth Osborne Oct, 2009 Throwing Off the Cloak cover

Throwing off the cloak opens a window onto the Torres Strait Islands peoples’ struggles for control over their own lives, and recognition of their unique island identities and aspirations. For 160 years the Islanders have resisted governments’ continued dismissal of their ambitions.

The Legend of the Seven Sisters: A traditional Aboriginal story from Western Australia Sue Wyatt, May O'Brien Jul, 2009 seven sisters cover

In this wonderful retelling of a Dreaming story of the Wongutha people from the Eastern goldfields, Aboriginal author May O'Brien explains how the Seven Sisters (Pleiades) came to be. Beautifully illustrated by Sue Wyatt, the book offers teachers and librarians a way to introduce traditional Aboriginal beliefs, Dreaming stories and language to their students.

Aboriginal Business: Alliances in a remote Aboriginal town Kimberly Christen Jul, 2009 Aboriginal Business cover

Christen worked collaboratively with Warumungu people to establish a digital archive of Warumungu history and culture, and contributed to the development of the Nyinkka Nyunyu Art and Culture Centre.

Bangu the Flying Fox: A Dreamtime story of the Yuin people of Wallaga Lake Jillian Taylor, Penny Jones, Aaron Norris Jul, 2009 bangu the flying fox cover

A traditional Dreaming story from the Yuin people of Wallaga Lake, Bangu explores the importance of belonging and identification. Simply told, it works wonderfully both as a read-aloud story book or for beginning readers.

Bittangabee Tribe: An Aboriginal story from Coastal New South Wales Rebecca Kirby, Liddy Stewart, Beryl M. Cruse, Steven Thomas Jul, 2009 Bittangabee Tribe cover

Written by Aboriginal students at Bega TAFE, and illustrated by Aboriginal children from Eden Public School, this delightful book tells the story of Ninima, his wife Mina and their children and the rhythms of their traditional life on the south coast of NSW. Kinship, landscape and cultural knowledge are gently explored, providing an excellent resource for exploring Indigenous and environmental issues.

Back on The Block: Bill Simon’s Story Bill Simon, Des Montgomerie, Joanne Tuscano May, 2009 back on the block cover

Stolen, beaten, deprived of his liberty and used as child labour, Bill Simon’s was not a normal childhood. He was told his mother didn’t want him, that he was ‘the scum of the earth’ and was locked up in the notorious Kinchela Boys Home for eight years. His experiences there would shape his life forever. From his home on The Block in Sydney’s Redfern, one of the most contentious and misunderstood places in Australia, Bill Simon tells the truth about life in one of Australia’s most terrible juvenile institutions, where thousands of boys were warehoused and abused.

Between Indigenous Australia and Europe: John Mawurndjul Claus Volkenandt, Christian Kaufmann Apr, 2009 Between Indigenous Australia and Europe cover

Increasingly, Australian Indigenous art is drawing the attention of international audiences, in part because of the amazing stories the artists tell of human creativity. John Mawurndjul is one of several Aboriginal artists whose work is collected and displayed in art museums and galleries throughout the world. From their different perspectives, renowned Australian contributors, Jon Altman, Sally Butler, Apolline Kohen, Howard Morphy, Judith Ryan, Luke Taylor and Paul S.C. Taçon, join a range of international commentators, to raise and debate key questions.

Yuendumu Everyday: Contemporary life in remote Aboriginal Australia Yasmine Musharbash Jan, 2009 Yuendumu Everyday cover

Yuendumu everyday explores intimacy, immediacy and mobility as the core principles underpinning contemporary everyday life in a central Australian Aboriginal settlement. It analyses an everyday shaped through the interplay between a not so distant hunter–gatherer past and the realities of living in a first-world nation–state.

Murray River Country: An Ecological Dialogue with Traditional Owners Jessica Weir Jan, 2009 murray river country cover

Murray River Country discusses the water crisis from a unique perspective – the intimate stories of love and loss from the viewpoints of Aboriginal peoples who know the inland rivers as their traditional country.  By engaging with the Murray-Darling Basin, Australia's agricultural heartland, Murray River Country goes to the core of our national understandings of who we are and how we can live in this country.

An appreciation of difference: WEH Stanner and Aboriginal Australia Melinda Hinkson, Jeremy Beckett Oct, 2008 an appreciation of difference cover

WEH Stanner was a public intellectual whose work reached beyond the walls of the academy, and he remains a highly significant figure in Aboriginal affairs and Australian anthropology. Educated by Radcliffe-Brown in Sydney and Malinowski in London, he undertook anthropological work in Australia, Africa and the Pacific.

An appreciation of difference: WEH Stanner and Aboriginal Australia Melinda Hinkson, Jeremy Beckett Oct, 2008 an appreciation of difference cover

Hinkson and Beckett have drawn together some of Australia’s leading academics working in Aboriginal studies to provide an historical and analytical context for WEH Stanner’s work, as well as demonstrating the continuing relevance of his writings in the contested field of Aboriginal affairs. Stanner was a public intellectual whose work reached beyond the walls of the academy, and he remains a highly significant figure in Aboriginal affairs and Australian anthropology.

Holding Men: Kanyirninpa and the health of Aboriginal men Brian McCoy May, 2008 holding men cover

This is an easily readable book that explores how Indigenous men understand their lives, their health and their culture. Using conversations, stories and art, the author shows how Kimberley desert communities have a cultural value and relationship described as kanyirninpa or holding.

Holding Men: Kanyirninpa and the health of Aboriginal men Brian McCoy May, 2008 holding men cover

This is an easily readable book that explores how Indigenous men understand their lives, their health and their culture. Using conversations, stories and art, the author shows how Kimberley desert communities have a cultural value and relationship described as kanyirninpa or holding.

Doreen Kartinyeri: My Ngarrindjeri calling Doreen Kartinyeri, Sue Anderson Apr, 2008 Doreen Kartinyeri cover

Doreen Kartinyeri was a female warrior, dedicated to upholding and protecting Ngarrindjeri law. In My Ngarrindjeri Calling Doreen Kartinyeri reveals a deep-set desire for social justice, fuelled by passionate love and anger. Her wit and humour abound, while her integrity and sense of justice are inspirational.

Doreen Kartinyeri: My Ngarrindjeri calling Doreen Kartinyeri, Sue Anderson Apr, 2008 Doreen Kartinyeri cover

Doreen Kartinyeri was a female warrior, dedicated to upholding and protecting Ngarrindjeri law. In this autobiography Doreen Kartinyeri reveals a deep-set desire for social justice, fuelled by passionate love and anger. Her wit and humour abound, while her integrity and sense of justice are inspirational.

Anna the Goanna and other poems Jill McDougall, Jenny Taylor Jan, 2008 Anna the Goanna cover

Cheeky dogs, slippery snakes and crocodiles with big smiles join Anna in this collection of lively illustrated poems. With warmth and respect, we’re taken into the children’s lives as they camp under the stars, go hunting for tucker and play footy in the dust.

Fight for Liberty and Freedom: The origins of Australian Aboriginal activism John Maynard Nov, 2007 liberty and freedom cover

The Australian Aboriginal Progressive Association (AAPA) began life in 1924. Although less known today, current Aboriginal political movement are drawn from these roots. In this passionate exploration of the life of founder, Fred Maynard, John Maynard reveals the commitment and sacrifices made by these Aboriginal heroes.

White Christ Black Cross: The emergence of a Black church Noel Loos Sep, 2007 white christ cover

Noel Loos frames the churches’ missionary outreach to Aboriginal people within the reality of frontier violence, government control, segregation and neglect. Aboriginal people on the missions responded to white Christianity as part of their enforced cultural change and within the missions’ changing circumstances.

White Christ Black Cross: The emergence of a Black church Noel Loos Sep, 2007 white christ cover

Noel Loos frames the churches’ missionary outreach to Aboriginal people within the reality of frontier violence, government control, segregation and neglect. Aboriginal people on the missions responded to white Christianity as part of their enforced cultural change and within the missions’ changing circumstances.

A Cautious Silence: The politics of Australian anthropology Geoff Gray Aug, 2007 cautious silence cover

This is the first exploration of modern Australian social anthropology which examines the forces that helped shaped its formation. Gray aims to help us understand the present organisational structures, and assist in the formulation of anthropology’s future role in Australia; to provide a wider political and social context for Australian social anthropology, and to consider the importance of anthropology as a past definer of Indigenous people.

Indigenous Partnerships in protected area management in Australia: Three case studies Toni Bauman,Dr Dermot Smyth Jul, 2007 cover

Part of the wider research project Success in Aboriginal Organisations, this report describes Indigenous partnerships in the management of three protected areas in Australia: Nitmiluk National Park, Booderee National Park and Dhimurru Indigenous Protected Area.

Life B'long Ali Drummond: A life in the Torres Strait Samantha Faulkner, Ali Drummond Jul, 2007 life b'long cover

Family is one of the most important things in Sam Faulkner’s life. Ali Drummond is Sam Faulkner's grandfather, and this is his story. Ali Drummond has had an extraordinary life, by any standards. Orphaned when young, Ali took to a life at sea aged fourteen. Originally taken on as an apprentice, Ali applied himself to learning the skills he needed to survive and prosper in a sometimes dangerous life seeking pearl shells, trochus and bêche de mer.

Life B'long Ali Drummond: A life in the Torres Strait Samantha Faulkner, Ali Drummond Jul, 2007 life b'long cover

Family is one of the most important things in Sam Faulkner’s life. Ali Drummond is Sam Faulkner's grandfather, and this is his story. Ali Drummond has had an extraordinary life, by any standards. Orphaned when young, Ali took to a life at sea aged fourteen. Originally taken on as an apprentice, Ali applied himself to learning the skills he needed to survive and prosper in a sometimes dangerous life seeking pearl shells, trochus and bêche de mer. Sam Faulkner has rendered Ali Drummond’s life with affection, skilfully weaving together Ali’s stories with colourful reminiscences from his family.

Maps to Success: successful strategies in Indigenous organisations AIATSIS Research Jun, 2007 Maps to Success cover

Maps to Success is the product of a national study to chart initiatives in local Indigenous organisations that had helped to promote community wellbeing and overcome disadvantage. It is a handbook Indigenous organisations can use in developing their own strategies for success.

The 1967 Referendum: Race, power and the Australian Constitution Bain Attwood May, 2007 referendum cover

On 27 May 1967 a remarkable event occurred. An overwhelming majority of electors voted in a national referendum to amend clauses of the Australian Constitution concerning Aboriginal people. Today it is commonly regarded as a turning point in the history of relations between Indigenous and white Australians. This was the historic moment when citizenship rights were granted — including the vote — and the Commonwealth at long last assumed responsibility for Aboriginal affairs. But the referendum did none of these things.

Convincing Ground: Learning to fall in love with your country Bruce Pascoe Apr, 2007 Convincing ground cover

Convincing ground is a wide-ranging, personal and powerful work which resonates with historical and contemporary Australian debates about identity, dispossession, memory and community.

Convincing Ground: Learning to fall in love with your country Bruce Pascoe Apr, 2007 Convincing ground cover

Convincing ground is a wide-ranging, personal and powerful work which resonates with historical and contemporary Australian debates about identity, dispossession, memory and community.

Convincing Ground: Learning to fall in love with your country Bruce Pascoe Apr, 2007 Convincing ground cover

Convincing ground is a wide-ranging, personal and powerful work which resonates with historical and contemporary Australian debates about identity, dispossession, memory and community.

Disciplining the Savages: Savaging the disciplines Prof Martin Nakata Mar, 2007 disciplining the savages cover

Disciplining the savages: Savaging the disciplines provides alternative reading for those struggling with the contradictory and ambiguous intersections of academia and Indigenous experience. In doing so, it moves beyond the usual criticisms of the disciplines which construct the way we have come to know and understand Indigenous peoples.

Disciplining the Savages: Savaging the disciplines Prof Martin Nakata Mar, 2007 disciplining the savages cover

Disciplining the savages: Savaging the disciplines provides alternative reading for those struggling with the contradictory and ambiguous intersections of academia and Indigenous experience. In doing so, it moves beyond the usual criticisms of the disciplines which construct the way we have come to know and understand Indigenous peoples.

Trustees on Trial: Recovering the stolen wages Rosalind Kidd Sep, 2006 Trustees on Trial cover

Ros Kidd uses official correspondence to reveal the extraordinary extent of government controls over Aboriginal wages, savings, endowments and pensions in twentieth century Queensland. In a disturbing indictment of the government’s $4000 reparations offer, Kidd unpicks official dealings on the huge trust funds compiled from private income and community endeavours, showing how governments used these finances to their advantage, while families and communities struggled in poverty.

Trustees on Trial: Recovering the stolen wages Rosalind Kidd Sep, 2006 Trustees on Trial cover

Ros Kidd uses official correspondence to reveal the extraordinary extent of government controls over Aboriginal wages, savings, endowments and pensions in twentieth century Queensland. In a disturbing indictment of the government’s $4000 reparations offer, Kidd unpicks official dealings on the huge trust funds compiled from private income and community endeavours, showing how governments used these finances to their advantage, while families and communities struggled in poverty.

Aboriginal Darwin: A guide to exploring important sites of the past and present Toni Bauman Aug, 2006 aboriginal darwin cover

To most visitors and locals, Darwin is a vibrant, tropical city in the Top End. Although not always obvious to visitors, Darwin is also a living Aboriginal cultural landscape. Aboriginal Darwin peels back layers to show the rich heritage and complex cultures of Aboriginal people, both before and since colonisation.

Writing Never Arrives Naked: Early Aboriginal cultures of writing in Australia Penny Van Toorn Jul, 2006 Writing Never Arrives Naked cover

In Writing never arrives naked, Penny van Toorn engages our minds and hearts. Her academically innovative book reveals the resourceful and often poignant ways that Indigenous Australians involved themselves in the coloniser’s paper culture. The first Aboriginal readers were children stolen from the clans around Sydney Harbour. The first Aboriginal author was Bennelong — a stolen adult.

Writing Never Arrives Naked: Early Aboriginal cultures of writing in Australia Penny Van Toorn Jul, 2006 Writing Never Arrives Naked cover

In Writing never arrives naked, Penny van Toorn engages our minds and hearts. Her academically innovative book reveals the resourceful and often poignant ways that Indigenous Australians involved themselves in the coloniser’s paper culture. The first Aboriginal readers were children stolen from the clans around Sydney Harbour. The first Aboriginal author was Bennelong — a stolen adult.

The social archaeology of Australian Indigenous societies Bruno David, Bryce Barker Jun, 2006 social archaeology cover

Building on the foundational work of Harry Lourandos, the book critically examines and challenges traditional approaches which have presented Indigenous Australian pasts as static and tethered to ecological rationalism.

Rob Riley: An Aboriginal leader's quest for justice Quentin Beresford Apr, 2006 rob riley cover

Widely regarded as one of the great Aboriginal leaders of the modern era, Rob Riley was at the centre of debates that have polarised views on race relations in Australia: national land rights, the treaty, deaths in custody, self-determination, the

Rob Riley: An Aboriginal leader's quest for justice Quentin Beresford Apr, 2006 rob riley cover

Set against the tumultuous background of racial politics in an unreconciled nation, this book explores Rob’s rise and influence as an Aboriginal activist. Drawing on perspectives from history, politics and psychology, this work explores Rob’s life as a ‘moral protester’ and the challenges he confronted in trying to change the destiny of the nation.

A Man of All Tribes: The life of Alick Jackomos Richard Broome, Corinne Manning Jan, 2006 A Man of All Tribes: The life of Alick Jackomos cover

Alick Jackomos was the son of Greek migrant parents, born in Collingwood, and who grew up during the Great Depression. His is a remarkable life that recaptures stories of diverse communities and ways of life now vanished from sight.

A Man of All Tribes: The life of Alick Jackomos Richard Broome, Corinne Manning Jan, 2006 A Man of All Tribes: The life of Alick Jackomos cover

Alick Jackomos was the son of Greek migrant parents, born in Collingwood, who grew up during the Great Depression. His is a remarkable life that recaptures stories of diverse communities and ways of life now vanished from sight.

The Rain Flower Mary Duroux Oct, 2005 rain flower cover

The Rain Flower is an adventure story about the journey of the night creatures and the day creatures to find a rain flower that will benefit them all. Their journey is one of learning: how to unite, seek advice, give opinion and work together — and their discovery is unexpected. By story’s end, readers can embark on their own journey to discover a rain flower.

Unfinished Constitutional Business? Rethinking Indigenous self-determination Barbara Hocking Sep, 2005 Unfinished Constitutional Business cover

Indigenous self-determination is the recognised right of all peoples to freely determine their political status, and pursue their economic, social and cultural development. Unfinished constitutional business? offers fresh insights into the ways communities can chart their own course and realise self-determination.

Unfinished Constitutional Business? Rethinking Indigenous self-determination Barbara Hocking Sep, 2005 Unfinished Constitutional Business cover

Indigenous self-determination is the recognised right of all peoples to freely determine their political status, and pursue their economic, social and cultural development. Unfinished Constitutional Business? offers fresh insights into the ways communities can chart their own course and realise self-determination.

Mutton Fish: The surviving culture of Aboriginal people and abalone on the south coast of NSW Beryl M. Cruse, Liddy Stewart, Sue Norman Apr, 2005 mutton fish cover

The people of the south coast of NSW have a long and complex relationship with the coastal environment; one that has nurtured them for thousands of years. Mutton Fish includes lively interviews with Aboriginal people who have fished traditionally and taken part in the modern fishing industry. With clarity, it introduces some of the issues that arise when Indigenous cultural practice confronts white law.

Uncommon Ground: White women in Aboriginal history Anna Cole, Victoria Haskins, Fiona Paisley Apr, 2005 Uncommon Ground cover

Uncommon ground brings together a unique collection of essays about the complex roles played by white women in Australian Indigenous histories. It showcases some of the latest and most interesting work in Australia on gender and cross-cultural history.

The Power of Knowledge, the Resonance of Tradition Luke Taylor,Dr Graeme K Ward, Richard Davis, Graham Henderson, Lynley Wallis Apr, 2005 power of knowledge cover

The power of knowledge, the resonance of tradition is a ground-breaking critique of the concept of ‘tradition’ applied in the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander context. The authors offer a refreshing new style of analysis. In writing that is rich in detail, strong in analysis and informed by their research experience they argue for a deeper appreciation of the creativity inherent in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander social life, and the way that knowledge is constructed and deployed in complex intercultural contexts in contemporary Australia.

Mutton Fish: The surviving culture of Aboriginal people and abalone on the south coast of NSW Beryl M. Cruse, Liddy Stewart, Sue Norman Apr, 2005 mutton fish cover

The people of the south coast of NSW have a long and complex relationship with the coastal environment; one that has nurtured them for thousands of years. Mutton Fish, unique in its breadth and accessibility, seeks to tell of this relationship and what has happened to the south coast people as their access to the coastal resources has been progressively restricted by European competition.

Uncommon Ground: White women in Aboriginal history Anna Cole, Victoria Haskins, Fiona Paisley Apr, 2005 Uncommon Ground cover

Uncommon ground brings together a unique collection of essays about the complex roles played by white women in Australian Indigenous histories. It showcases some of the latest and most interesting work in Australia on gender and cross-cultural history.

The Little Platypus and the Fire Spirit Mundara Koorang Jan, 2005 little platypus cover

Learn how the little platypus, with the help of a fire spirit, became the curious creature we know today, diving, swimming and floating in the billabongs and rivers of the bush. A picture book for new and young readers.

Paint Me Black: Memories of Croker Island and other journeys Claire Henty-Gebert Jan, 2005 paint me black cover

Claire Henty-Gebert’s life is remarkable. Born in the late 1930s, the daughter of a white settler and an Alyawarra woman, Claire was four years old when she was taken to the Bungalow mission in Alice Springs. Much of her young life was then spent in the newly formed Croker Mission. Claire’s reminiscences of life on Croker and being sent south to escape the threat from Japanese fighters during World War II combine conventional documentary sources, cultural knowledge and people’s memories.

Wunambi the Water Snake May O'Brien, Sue Wyatt Jan, 2005 Wunambi the Water Snake cover

This is a story of the time when the earth was young and the land was being created. It tells of a powerful and awesome water snake called Wunambi. The Wongutha people of the Eastern Goldfields area of Western Australia say that this huge creature roamed the earth, and that the great tracks it made became the creeks and rivers we know today. Wunambi is still regarded with great respect by Aboriginal people.

Cleared Out: First contact in the Western Desert Peter Johnson, Yuwali Nixon, Susan Davenport Jan, 2005 Cleared Out cover

In 1964, a group of 20 Aboriginal women and children in the Western Desert made their first contact with European Australians — patrol officers from the Woomera Rocket Range, clearing an area into which rockets were to be fired. They had been pursued by the patrol officers for several weeks, running from this frightening new force in the desert.

Auntie Rita Jackie Huggins, Rita Huggins Jan, 2005 Auntie Rita cover

Rita Huggins told her memories to her daughter Jackie, and some of their conversation is in this book. We witness their intimacy, their similarities and their differences, the 'fighting with their tongues'. Two voices, two views on a shared life.

Paper and Talk: A manual for reconstituting materials in Australian Indigenous languages Nick Thieberger Jan, 2005 paper and talk cover

This is a concise guide and an excellent introduction to the complicated issues of language reconstruction. For example, finding out about languages that are no longer spoken, or those that are still spoken by only a few people, can be a long and difficult process. And taking texts and wordlists from historical sources and making them useful in current language programs and literature presents a variety of challenges. Each contributor to Paper and Talk works through some of the complex issues vital to language workers in an accessible, easy-to-read style.

Whitening Race: Essays in social and cultural criticism Prof Aileen Moreton-Robinson Nov, 2004 Whitening Race cover

With its focus on Australia, Whitening race engages with relations between migration, Indigenous dispossession and whiteness. It creates a new intellectual space that investigates the nature of racialised conditions and their role in reproducing colonising relations in Australia.

Whitening Race: Essays in social and cultural criticism Prof Aileen Moreton-Robinson Nov, 2004 Whitening Race cover

With its focus on Australia, Whitening race engages with relations between migration, Indigenous dispossession and whiteness. It creates a new intellectual space that investigates the nature of racialised conditions and their role in reproducing colonising relations in Australia.

Thinking Black: William Cooper and the Australian Aborigines' League Bain Attwood, Andrew Markus Oct, 2004 thinking black cover

Most non-Indigenous Australians know of Charles Perkins. Many are familiar with a few other Aboriginal leaders. Yet few have heard of William Cooper, one of the most important Aboriginal leaders in Australia’s history. Thinking Black tells the story of Cooper and the Australian Aborigines’ League, and their campaign for Aboriginal people’s rights to justice and their vision of equality in Australia of two peoples: equal yet distinct.

A Bend in the Yarra: A history of the Merri Creek Protectorate Station and Merri Creek Aboriginal School 1841–1851 Ian Clark, Toby Heydon Oct, 2004 a bend in the yarra cover

The Yarra Bend Park marks one of the most important post-contact places in the Melbourne metropolitan area, and is of great significance to Victorian Aboriginal people, particularly the Wurundjeri Aboriginal community.

Thinking Black: William Cooper and the Australian Aborigines' League Bain Attwood, Andrew Markus Oct, 2004 thinking black cover

Most non-Indigenous Australians know of Charles Perkins. Many are familiar with a few other Aboriginal leaders. Yet few have heard of William Cooper, one of the most important Aboriginal leaders in Australia’s history. Thinking Black tells the story of Cooper and the Australian Aborigines’ League, and their campaign for Aboriginal people’s rights.

A Record in Stone: A study of Australia's flaked stone artefacts Simon Holdaway, Nicola Stern Aug, 2004 a record in stone cover

A Record in Stone is a comprehensive investigation into the different ways in which archaeologists use flaked stone artefacts as a basis for reconstructing the distant human past.

Thinking Black: William Cooper and the Australian Aborigines' League Bain Attwood, Andrew Markus Jun, 2004 thinking black cover

Most non-Indigenous Australians know of Charles Perkins. Many are familiar with a few other Aboriginal leaders. Yet few have heard of William Cooper, one of the most important Aboriginal leaders in Australia’s history. Thinking Black tells the story of Cooper and the Australian Aborigines’ League, and their campaign for Aboriginal people’s rights.

Reading Doctors' Writing: Race, politics and power in Indigenous health research 1870–1969 David Piers Thomas Jun, 2004 reading doctors writing cover

This history of Indigenous health research fuels the suspicion felt by Indigenous people today about researchers, and research. Reading Doctors’ Writing invites those involved in Indigenous health research to confront rather than evade the history and politics of their work.

Very Big Journey: My life as I remember it Hilda Jarman Muir Jan, 2004 very big journey cover

Hilda Muir was born on the very frontier of modern Australia, near the outback town of Borroloola in the Northern Territory in about 1920. Very Big Journey tells of Hilda’s bush childhood, and her forced removal from a loving family to the rigours of life in the Kahlin Home for half-caste children.

Dhuuluu-Yala: To talk straight Anita M. Heiss Aug, 2003 dhuuluu-yala cover

Dhuuluu-Yala is a Wiradjuri phrase meaning ‘to talk straight’ and this book is straight talk about publishing Indigenous literature in Australia. It also includes broader issues that writers need to consider: engaging with readers and reviewers. The history of defining Aboriginality in Australia and the experience of ‘being Aboriginal’ have both impacted on the production of Aboriginal writing today. These twin themes are the major focus of the book.

Treaty! Let's get it right AIATSIS Collections Jun, 2003 treaty cover

This collection of essays was commissioned by ATSIC and AIATSIS to stimulate discussion and debate about a treaty.

Treaty! Let's get it right AIATSIS Collections Jun, 2003 treaty cover

This collection of essays was commissioned by ATSIC and AIATSIS to stimulate discussion and debate about a treaty.

Paddy's Road: Life stories of Patrick Dodson Kevin James Keeffe Jan, 2003 paddy's road cover

While Patrick Dodson's bearded image is well known, the remarkable history of this outstanding Aboriginal leader has never before been told. In Paddy's Road, Kevin Keeffe brings us stories of Dodson's life woven from interviews, government archives and family stories. Paddy's Road is the history of one family, the biography of one man and a powerful story of an Australian life.

Something Special: The inside story of the Katherine West Health Board Katherine West Health Board Jan, 2003

Something Special tells the story of a unique and successful ‘experiment’ in which the delivery of health services in the Katherine region in the Northern Territory were ‘handed over’ to ‘a group of grassroots-oriented Aboriginal people’.

Indigenous Peoples and Governance Structures: A comparative analysis of land and resource rights Garth Nettheim, Gary Meyers, Donna Craig Jan, 2002 governance structures cover

This book examines the policies and practices of Canada, the United States, Greenland, Denmark, Norway, New Zealand and Australia concerning governance on Aboriginal land including emerging systems for the management of native title areas, and the incorporation of Indigenous interests into land administration.

Aboriginal Suicide is Different: A portrait of life and self-destruction Colin Tatz Jan, 2001 aboriginal suicide is different cover

Aboriginal Suicide is Different is a study of youth who have, or feel they have, no purpose in life — or who may be seeking freedom in death. It is a portrait of life, and of self-destruction, by young Australian Aboriginal men and women.

Settlement: A history of Australian Indigenous housing Peter Read Jan, 2000 settlement cover

Settlement traces the history of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander housing from the shelters used in pre-invasion to the Victorian missionaries' cottages, through to the dreaded children's dormitory to the compound and its horrors of disease and overcrowding. It also explores contemporary themes such as gender, family-friendly prisons, self-built housing and designs for sustainability.

Black Gold: The Aboriginal and Islander Sports Hall of Fame Colin Tatz, Paul Tatz Jan, 2000 black gold cover

Beautifully illustrated with black and white photographs, Black gold showcases our Olympic heroes, superb sportswomen, football giants, boxing legends, lightning sprinters and more -- from darts champions to world-class weightlifters and woodchoppers.

Love against the law: The autobiographies of Tex and Nelly Camfoo Gillian Cowlishaw, Nellie Camfoo Jan, 2000 love against the law cover

The stories of Tex and Nelly Camfoo intermingle to highlight the ambiguous social position of Aboriginals living in the Northern Territory during the last century. They provide insight into race relations, the contradictory attitudes of missionaries and police, they reflect morality and religion as well as recent political developments.

Don't Ask For Stories: Women from Ernabella and their Art Ute Eikelcamp Jan, 1999 dont ask for stories cover

This collection of histories, in both written and illustrative form, tells the story from 'first missionary coming', atomic bomb tests in 1950 to commercial success in the 1990s. The beautiful batiks from Ernabella are exhibited throughout the world and the artists are sought after as teachers in Australia and internationally.

The Glow Worm Cave Anne Morgan, Belinda Kurczok Jan, 1999 glow worm cover

For thousands of years the Creature has lived in the forest’s glow worm cave. But its peaceful life will soon be destroyed if the local mining company is allowed to mine the area. The Glow Worm People are the only ones who can save the Creature and the cave. Will they be able to stop the blasting? A charming, beautifully illustrated picture book for 8-12 year olds.

Gong-Wapitja: Women and art from Yirrkala Gillian Hutcherson May, 1998 gong-wapitja cover

Contemporary women artists of the Yirrkala community in Northeast Arnhem Land create a wide variety of art and craft, from feathered string for ceremonies to large-scale murals for public buildings and their works are represented in many public and private collections. Gong-Wapitja, with its informative Introduction, is a beautifully written and illustration survey of the art forms and choice of imagery of the female artists.

Unwritten Histories Craig Cormick Feb, 1998 unwritten histories cover

In this witty and satirical revisiting of Australia’s heroic past, Craig Cormick rediscovers the contributions of Indigenous Australians that have always remained unrecorded and unacknowledged, Australia’s unwritten histories.

Torres Strait Islander Women and the Pacific War Elizabeth Osborne Jan, 1997 Torres Strait Islander women cover

Between 1942 and 1945, Torres Strait Islander women experienced the fears and uncertainties of living virtually on Australia's front line during the Pacific War. Some were forcibly evacuated with their children to the mainland, where they found themselves still restricted as to where and how they could live.

Scholar and Sceptic Australian Aboriginal Studies in Honour of LR Hiatt Francesca Merlan, John Morton, Alan Rumsey Jan, 1997 Scholar and Sceptic cover

This volume celebrates the life and work of one of Australia’s foremost anthropologists, LR Hiatt. Hiatt sought to bring the study of Aboriginal societies to the attention of both the academic world and the wider public.

No Ordinary Judgment: Mabo, the Murray Islanders' Land Case Nonie Sharp Jan, 1996 no ordinary judgement cover

This is the inside story of the Mabo case, a unique court drama where rights and interests previously unknown to Anglo-Australian law came to be recognised by the High Court of Australia.

The Great Forgetting Bevan Bert Hayward, Geoff D. Page Jan, 1996 great forgetting cover

The great forgetting conveys the forgotten story of Australia during the past couple of hundred years. In poetry and with striking reproductions, it tells of the interaction between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people: the brutality, arrogance, honest misunderstandings, occasional decencies and continuing unresolved problems.

Black Mary and Gunjies: Two plays by Julie Janson (Nibago) Julie Janson Jan, 1996 black mary gunjies cover

The play Black Mary brings to life the story of Aboriginal bushranger Mary Ann and her partner, Captain Thunderbolt, who roamed northwestern New South Wales in the mid-nineteenth century. Mary Ann is one of the gang, managing to survive in the outback and to elude capture most of the time. A contemporary play, Gunjies combines family life, young love, a football match and a debutante ball with political activism, racial discrimination and uneasy relations with police (the gunjies).

Bush Toys: Aboriginal children at play Claudia Haagen Jan, 1995 Bush toys cover

From spears, shields and throwing sticks to hockey, marbles and fireworks, this beautifully illustrated and cleverly structured book builds for the reader a unique picture of the lives of Aboriginal children in the past and present, and adds significantly to records of Aboriginal society then and now.

King Plates: A history of Aboriginal Gorgets Jakelin Troy Jan, 1993

King Plates describes and illustrates a large collection of Aboriginal gorgets, also called king or brass plates. These were presented to perceived 'chiefs', faithful servants and to the specially courageous by governors and land holders. In other words, they were given to anyone who helped in some way to ease the white settlers' progress in the new colonies. The book serves as an encouragement to other scholars to research in this area but also to Aboriginal people seeking information about their forebears.

Stars of Tagai: The Torres Strait Islanders Nonie Sharp Jan, 1993 Stars of Tagai cover

Stars of Tagai describes life among the blue-water people of the Torres Strait Islands. It explores the changing life of these sea people: their creation and re-creation of identity, and their unique sea culture rich in meaning and custom.

Learning The Ropes: The life story of a 'King of Knockouts' Keith Saunders Jan, 1992 learning the ropes cover

From the lean and terrifying days of the Depression in rural New South Wales to the exhilaration and excess of Australian boxing in the sixties and after, the life of boxer Keith Saunders has been extraordinary. In this fast-paced, funny autobiography that includes some electrifying first-hand accounts of great Australian fights, we glimpse a little of the indulgent world that opened to a few successful boxers, the frustration felt by those Australians who endure racial indignities, and also some of the horror and tragedy of the boxing ring.

Kamilaroi and Kurnai Lorimer Fison, William Howitt Jan, 1991

A 'landmark in Australian anthropology' when it first appeared in 1880, this is the first major analysis of Aboriginal social structure, adopting a model today termed 'social Darwinist'. While this theory is now rejected, it exerted tremendous influence on European attitudes for decades, making this an important sourcebook for such ideas.

Being Black: Aboriginal cultures in 'settled' Australia Ian D. Keen Jan, 1991 being black cover

Being black brings together the results of research by a range of renowned anthropologists focusing on the social life of people who used to be labelled 'part-Aborigines' or 'urban Aborigines'. The research cover issues like the basis of identity; the ties of family; the structure of communities; ways of speaking; beliefs and feelings about country, and attitudes to the past.

Boigu: Our history and culture Boigu Island Community Council Jan, 1991 boigu cover

Boigu is a lively collection of writings from the past and present. It includes stories of brave warriors and traditional customs, of love and hope, of everyday experiences and practices, of business enterprises and industrial disputes, and of friendships and religious influences.

Born of the Conquerers: Selected essays by Judith Wright Judith Wright Jan, 1991 Born of the Conquerors cover

One of Australia's best known poets, Judith Wright, brings together for the first time a selection of twenty-one essays. Her messages about our need to preserve Aboriginal culture and care for the land run through them all.

Somebody Now: The autobiography of Ellie Gaffney, a woman of the Torres Strait Ellie Gaffney Jan, 1989 Somebody Now cover

Ellie Gaffney’s thirst for knowledge, her determination to succeed and her desire to help her people, shine through these pages as she tells the story of her life and the lives of those she touched.

Conserving Australian rock art: A manual for site management David Lambert Jan, 1989 Conserving Australian Rock Art cover

Intended primarily for managers of rock art in Australia, this manual covers such areas as deterioration processes, sources of damage, visitor management and practical conservation. Examples and colour illustrations are included.

Reaching Back: Queensland Aboriginal people recall early days at Yarrabah mission Judy Thomson Jan, 1989 reaching back cover

Reaching back takes us back to Yarrabah Mission, two generations of Aboriginal people relive the days in Queensland under the Act, through vivid accounts and numerous photographs. They recall dormitory and school life, marriage and work at the mission, the struggle for survival during the Depression years and the loss of their language and culture. In this book the Aboriginal people of North Queensland are reaching back to their roots, and trying to pass on to their children a sense of pride in being Aboriginal.

ROM: An Aboriginal ritual of democracy Stephen Wild Jan, 1986 rom cover

The first ROM ceremony to be performed outside Arnhem Land was held when Anbarra people from north-central Arnhem Land presented a Rom to AIATSIS in 1982. This was in appreciation of the work done by the Institute. Several thousand people attended during the four days of ceremonies on Canberra.

Born a Half Caste Marnie Kennedy Jan, 1985 Born a Half Caste cover

Marnie Kennedy was born on the banks of the Coppermine Creek in western Queensland in 1919. Marnie tells of her journey to Palm Island where she grew up ‘under the Act’ which dominated the lives of Aboriginal people in that state.

Dialogue About Land Justice: Papers from the national Native Title Conferences Dr Lisa Strelein dialogue about land justice cover

Summary

The road to Australia: Memoirs of Vladimir Kabo Vladimir Kabo road to australia cover

Russian ethnographer Vladimir Kabo's passion for more than 30 years has been the study of Australia's Indigenous people. Continually denied permission to travel abroad, he finally arrived in Australia in 1990 to start a new life. This memoir records his life and work against the background of Soviet political and academic life since the revolution.

Return to Palm Island Bill Rosser palm island cover

In 1976, Bill Rosser visited friends on Palm Island and was shocked at the restrictions the Aboriginal people living there were forced to endure. He recorded their lives and stories in his first book, This is Palm Island (Australian Institute of Aboriginal Studies, 1978). In the 1980s, Rosser went back to Palm Island and this book is an account of his experiences and the changes he saw in both the people and the place.

Heavy Metal: The social meaning of petrol sniffing in Australia Margaret A. Brady heavy metal cover

In an attempt to go beyond current explanations of Aboriginal drug abuse, which stereotype these people as 'victims', Brady focuses on understanding the users' subjective decisions to engage in this behaviour. She provides an overview of the use of drugs among Aboriginal people and surveys the extant international literature.

Interview with author Diana Eades Diana Eades
Landscapes of Indigenous Performance Fiona Magowan, Karl Neuenfeldt Landscapes of Indigenous Performance cover

Landscapes of Indigenous Performance brings together a wide range of contemporary explorations of Indigenous music and dance in the Torres Strait and the tropical regions of the Northern Territory. This collection shows how traditional music and dance have responded to colonial control in the past and more recently to other external forces beyond local control. Indigenous and non-Indigenous contributors demonstrate how local music and dance genres have been subject to missionary, institutional, popular and global influences.

Remembering the future Melinda Hinkson
Language and Culture in Aboriginal Australia Colin Yallop

How many Aboriginal languages exist, where are they spoken and how are they learned by children? Do dictionaries of Aboriginal languages exist? What kinds of new language have emerged in the last two hundred years? What is the connection between land, people and language in Aboriginal Australia? How does the use of English disadvantage Aboriginal people? Language and Culture in Aboriginal Australia offers answers to these questions, and more.